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outrage

★★★★★

REVIEWER: lyall carter

After young bookkeeper Ann Walton’s boyfriend Jim receives a raise they finally decide to marry. Staying late at work one night, Ann notices she is being stalked and tries to run away from the man who is following her. She is unable to hide and is eventually caught and raped by the man who works the concession stand. Her life shattered, Ann runs away to Los Angeles where a young preacher tries to help her rebuild her life. 

For a film that was released over seventy years ago, Outrage is a truly raw film of thundering power that compassionately and bravely tackles issues that unfortunately women still face today. 

Although the word rape is never mentioned, Outrage you can't help but realize just how trailblazing, controversial, and culture shaking it would have been when it was first released in 1950. At a very short run time of just over an hour, Outrage is beautifully paced, drawing the audience deep into the narrative and the characters that inhabit it. 

The issues that Outrage exposes and confronts from the micro aggression of men towards women throughout the film to the institutional and judicial failings to the disapproving stares of society, Outrage is sobering in the realization that this film could exist in today's culture. It is a very necessary reminder that as a society we have still have so far to come. 

 

Outrage is also a technically brilliant and beautiful film in its cinematography, the use of light and the lack of it in its composition, to the shots that director Ida Lupino (one of the very few women directors to be working in Hollywood during the 50's) choses.

For a film that was released over seventy years ago, Outrage is a truly raw film of thundering power that compassionately and bravely tackles issues that unfortunately women still face today. 

★★★★★